NPR One Feature Changes and Updates August 2016

Sep 7, 2016

Our NPR One Local Team has been hard at work on two key goals: building stronger individual relationships with listeners and improving the station experience on the app. To both of these ends, we have some news to share.

To ensure a consistent experience across platforms and promote longer listening, we’re encouraging user profiles, recommending content using the explore feature, and getting listeners to stories faster. We’re also adding the ability to upload your newscasts as .wav files to make them easier to upload with higher quality audio.

Read more about these updates and reminders below, and stay tuned for continuous improvements in NPR One.

Live Today: npr.org Station Finder, Header and Profile Improvements
Keeping digital users connected to your station.

Our listeners may lead multi-platform lives, but they want to stay with your station across all of NPR’s platforms. Now, users who are logged into npr.org and NPR One will see the same stations. If a users is not logged in, we prompt them to create a user profile and save a local station. We'll continue to improve this connection between listener and preferred station over the next few months. 

Coming this fall: Changes to NPR One’s “Hello” Sequence
We will be changing what listeners hear when they start NPR One.

Listener and station feedback, as well as, skipping data have prompted us to make a change in the audio that plays when NPR One is launched.

Over the coming weeks, we will be eliminating the national production sequence your station’s “hello audio” precedes. Instead, your station’s “Station Hello” will be the first and only introductory audio listeners hear before the flow of stories begins.

What you need to do before the change: 
Take a listen to your station's "Hello Audio" in StationConnect and make sure it works as a stand alone introduction to NPR One. If you are using the NPR-produced hello message for your station, now would be a good time to create one with your own local voices. 

What should a Station Hello message be?
It is a short 3-10 second announcement with no music that introduces your station and NPR One. It can be single voice or multiple voice production. 

Sample language
WXYZ is right here on NPR One.
I'm............ and this is WXYZ on NPR One
WXYZ bringing you news from (location) and around the world on NPR One.

Keep it short and sweet: This is not the time nor place to tell users about everything your station does. To successfully create a relationship with them, they first need to experience the value of what we do together on NPR One. That means getting them quickly to what they came for: content! It's why we're getting rid of the national branding message and why we are working on other opportunities within NPR One to connect listeners to your station's other offerings.

More information about station hellos and audio branding can be found here. Questions or comments about this change can be sent to Tamar Charney at NPROne@ds.npr.org.

Reminder: Use "Explore" to find stories, shows, and podcasts on NPR One

At the beginning of the year we rolled out a new way for NPR One listeners to find new content, and therefore listen longer. It is called "Explore."

"Explore" gives listeners a quick overview of what they've hear, what they will hear, and what they might want to hear. 

We'll call your attention to two sections in this tab: "Featured Shows" and "Recommended." Both of them include recent podcasts from your station. In the coming weeks, we'll introduce new curation tools so you can designate three priority shows to be featured in "Explore."

Like all features of NPR One, "Explore" is made better through A/B testing. We'll continue to test and develop "Explore" to increase engagement with stories.

Reminder: Switch to .wav and update your expiration for newscasts
Newscasts are now easier to upload, have better quality, and last longer

If you are currently creating newscasts in mp3 or mp4 format, you can now update your workflow to use a .wav file instead. Because most audio editor software can output a .wav file directly, this should remove the extra step of encoding to mp3 or mp4. Your audio will also sound better in the app, because we will handle levels and LUFS for you before it reaches the app listeners. 

Don't forget, we also give you the option to customize your newscast expiration to better fit your station's needs. You can now select 2-,4-, or 6-hour expiration in StationConnect, with a default setting of 2 hours. 

Read more about expiration and the .wav update here. 

Questions?

Contact the NPR One team by emailing NPROne@ds.npr.org. We're here to help!